Armies of Liberation

Jane Novak's blog about Yemen

Al Iman South, new religious university opens in Aden

Filed under: Religious, al Iman — by Jane Novak at 6:21 pm on Sunday, October 21, 2012

Aden Tomorrow: Recently opened in the city of Aden branch of the University of faith .. They university founded by and run by Sheikh Abdul Majid al-Zindani, a wanted man internationally on charges of terrorism, has failed the former president and current in his recent visit to the United States to convince the president of dropping the man’s name from the black list as stated in some leaks.

“Islamist Movements in Yemen” published by the Center for Arab Unity Studies

Filed under: Civil Society, Demographics, Religious, Tribes — by Jane Novak at 10:55 am on Sunday, September 23, 2012

Book review in Al Monitor,Rise of Radical Islam in Yemen Altering Its Tribalism, Book Finds

Al Monitor: How can a country with a tribal society also see the spread of Islamic political movements? In anthropology, radicalism and tolerance are contradictory. In his book “Islamist Movements in Yemen” — published by the Center for Arab Unity Studies in Beirut — Dr. Abdul Malik Mohammed Abdullah Issa says that tribes constitute nearly 85% of the total Yemeni population and that there are 168 tribes in Yemen.

At the heart of this tribal social structure is also an Islamic religious identity. Yemeni society has historically been very religious. Although there are political differences within Yemeni society, there have not been ideological or religious differences except in a few cases — for example between Zaydi Shiite Houthis and Salafist Sunnis — and this is because most of Yemeni society belongs to the Shafi’i and Zaydi sects (there also used to be some Jews but most of them have emigrated to Israel).

Issa demonstrates that Yemeni society has historically been pragmatic. Yemenis come from one dynastic line from among the Arab Qahtani and Adnani lines. Yemeni society is highly tribal and religiously Muslim, divided between the Shafi’i and Zaydi sects. In his book, Issa explains the nature of these to sects and notes that there are very few differences between them. There are also some Ismailis, Hanafis, Abayidas, and Twelver Shiites, who came from Iraq during Saddam Hussein’s rule, and Wahhabis, who came from Saudi Arabia. (Read on …)

al Zindani interview English

Filed under: Religious, Yemen, personalities — by Jane Novak at 7:42 am on Sunday, September 23, 2012

AJE: Attacks against civilians from the West were forbidden, he said. When pressed, he distinguished between diplomats and soldiers – referring to the 50 US Marines controversially deployed to the US Embassy for protection after attacks.

Rather than openly endorsing attacks on soldiers, he preferred to mention those who should not be targeted.

“If there are civilian people and military trainers who the Yemeni government use to train [the army] for a limited time, they have protection guarantees,” he said. “But to bring forces for occupation which could expand – this is what we reject.” — (Read on …)

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